9:31 am - Jeu, Juil 24, 2014
435 notes
generic-art:

Frank Frazetta and Clint Eastwood with Frazetta’s artwork for The Gauntlet movie poster

generic-art:

Frank Frazetta and Clint Eastwood with Frazetta’s artwork for The Gauntlet movie poster

(via darksilenceinsuburbia)

8:35 am - Mar, Juil 22, 2014
14 406 notes

LYNCH dans ses œuvres

(Source : noblette, via cinematografo)

8:58 am - Dim, Juil 20, 2014
69 notes

CRONENBERG - CARPENTER - LANDIS

cinephiliabeyond:

A 1982 roundtable discussion with David Cronenberg, John Carpenter, and John Landis.

Here we have a thoroughly engaging roundtable featuring John Carpenter, John Landis, and a very young David Cronenberg from 1982. The group was gathered to talk for half an hour about their careers in the horror genre. Cronenberg, especially, is no stranger to controversy, and he talks at length about the sexual and violent themes that permeate his early films (and would continue on through much of his later work). Some highlights — and there are many — include Landis admitting he spent a full week on the An American Werewolf In London transformation scene and Cronenberg discussing the upsetting sight of a 3-year old girl attending a screening of Shivers. Also notable is that this discussion was filmed before two major achievements/masterpieces — The Thing for Carpenter and Videodrome for Cronenberg — and there is a sort of unspeakable gratification in knowing that the best is yet to come. It is a rare thing to see such major creative minds at, arguably, the very pinnacle of their output. —The Seventh Art

Here’s six of the Horror world’s leading figures dine together. Hosted by Clive Barker  with guests John Carpenter, Roger Corman, Ramsey Campbell, Lisa Tuttle and Pete Atkins. Aired in 1990.

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

10:19 am - Dim, Jui 29, 2014
4 notes
AMALRIC
© Denis rouvre

AMALRIC

© Denis rouvre

10:00 am
5 notes

JARMUSCH

@ Jérome Bonnet

@ Patrick Swirc

4:58 am - Sam, Jui 28, 2014
23 notes
kinoscript:

Samuel Fuller, White Dog.

kinoscript:

Samuel Fuller, White Dog.

(via chikuwaq)

5:27 am - Jeu, mai 29, 2014
179 notes
WEERASETHAKUL & TARR
speakingparts:

keyframedaily:

Apichatpong Weerasethakul and Béla Tarr.

♥
5:21 am
64 notes
KUROSAWA
amospoe:

“In a mad world, only the mad are sane.” ― Akira Kurosawa

KUROSAWA

amospoe:

“In a mad world, only the mad are sane.” 
― Akira Kurosawa

11:18 am - Mer, mai 28, 2014
174 notes

FASSBINDER

cinephiliabeyond:

One of the most prolific and influential European filmmakers of the second half of the 20th century, Rainer Werner Fassbinder completed nearly 40 feature-length films between 1969 and 1982 (the year he died at age 37) and left behind one of the most cohesive and provocative bodies of work in the history of cinema. In his many melodramas, gangster movies, literary adaptations, and even sci-fi films, he returned obsessively to themes of love, crime, labor, and social and emotional exploitation. He was similarly fixated on his beloved performers, many of whom — Hanna Schygulla, El Hedi ben Salem, Ulli Lommel, and countless others — comprised a repertory company whose fierce, complicated devotion to their visionary leader defies comparison. The Film Society of Lincoln Center extensive two-part retrospective (May 16—June 1) — the largest in New York City in over a decade — includes all of Fassbinder’s theatrical movies and many of his television films, along with several works connected with his eternally relevant artistry. Fassbinder: Romantic Anarchist (Part 1)

Get Film Comment’s Fassbinder digital anthology for just $0.99, featuring 35 years of exclusive coverage including a 1975 interview, articles by Manny Farber, Roger Greenspun, and Brooks Riley, profiles of his most frequent collaborators, and more.

“Every decent director has only one subject, and finally only makes the same film over and over again. My subject is the exploitability of feelings, whoever might be the one exploiting them. It never ends. It’s a permanent theme. Whether the state exploits patriotism, or whether in a couple relationship, one partner destroys the other.” RWF

Watching Fassbinder act and direct is a real treat. The following videos are required viewing for every aspiring director.

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

4:55 am - Dim, mai 25, 2014
99 notes
fuckyeahdirectors:

"The future of Hong Kong films lies in the Mainland territory. The market there has traditionally supported HK films, and I’m sure we can expand the market there in the near future. Stylistically I think the importance is not whether if HK films will resemble or not resemble Hollywood films, but whether we as local filmmakers can create fresh ideas. HK films have been very inventive in the last 50 years, and I hope this trend will continue."
Johnnie To 

fuckyeahdirectors:

"The future of Hong Kong films lies in the Mainland territory. The market there has traditionally supported HK films, and I’m sure we can expand the market there in the near future. Stylistically I think the importance is not whether if HK films will resemble or not resemble Hollywood films, but whether we as local filmmakers can create fresh ideas. HK films have been very inventive in the last 50 years, and I hope this trend will continue."

Johnnie To 

8:22 am - Jeu, mai 15, 2014
3 notes
writhisdown:

Cannes J+1 : Jane Campion, Présidente du Jury
© Vincent Flouret

writhisdown:

Cannes J+1 : Jane Campion, Présidente du Jury

© Vincent Flouret

3:53 am - Mar, mai 6, 2014
1 066 notes

WELLES

via idlesuperstar:

Happy Birthday Orson Welles: 6th May 1915 - 10th October 1985

Orson Welles is a giant with the face of a child, a tree filled with birds and shadows, a dog who has broken loose from his chains and gone to sleep on the flower-bed. He is an active loafer, a wise madman, a solitude surrounded by humanity. - Jean Cocteau

Ah, but Orson…that huge, strong man, you know that he’s very easily loved, but it’s very easy to hurt him…he’s capable of such beautiful things, and it’s so hard for him now to make a film that you wouldn’t be the little stone that stops the machine from going, once he has the chance to make a film.  - Jeanne Moreau

'The Ambersons' and 'Chimes at Midnight' represent more than anything else what I would now like to do in films…what I am trying to discover now in films is not the technical surprises or shocks, but a more complete unity of forms, of shapes. That's what I'm reaching for, what I hope is true. If it is, then I'm reaching maturity as an artist. If it isn't true, then I'm in decadence, you know? - Orson Welles, in 1965

(via the-dark-city)

3:48 am - Ven, mai 2, 2014
68 notes

cinephilearchive:

Gems from the archive of A-BitterSweet-Life: “‘Extending the language of film sometimes starts with just trying to show one true thing.’ If there is one thing that can be said about Samuel Fuller—besides his fantastic, out-there personality—it is that his understanding of film and its language is profound, and in these two episodes from the French TV Series ‘Cinéma Cinémas,’ he gives the viewer an intimate view on the creativity behind a filmmaker. Bringing to mind Robert Bresson’s notion on only showing the necessary, Fuller explains his dislike for establishing shots since they ‘show’ nothing:

I just hate a shot that shows a city or a street, and nothing happens. I don’t mind an establishing shot—even of a mountain, I don’t care, that’s a beautiful shot, snow, beautiful—if in that shot you pull back and there’s a little lovely lady, and she says to her son, “Isn’t this lovely? It’s Switzerland,” and he blows her head off, “Yes.” Something has to happen for me to have that full shot is what I’m talking about.

He then proceeds to explain how one ought to begin a film with a punch, an idea he brings into his films from his days as a crime reporter who believed the enticement of a story rested in the beginning, in the title.

Hey, Mom, Where’s My Suicide Note Collection?
Samuel Fuller interviewed
By Richard Thompson, Movietone News No. 50 (.pdf)

Fuller also shares great advice for directors on any level, whether working in independent or studio films. For him, a director is suppose to be able to ‘utilize what he has in front of him right there.’ This could not be any more true. Fuller adheres to preparation of course, however, he makes the important note that the act of directing involves a control of the present moment. Thus, Samuel Fuller’s advice to young filmmakers:

So for the benefit of all the young men who want to make a picture, always be in a position to control what you want because you never get another chance. You can not alibi. You can’t say later, when the picture is out, “Oh, I wanted to do this, I wanted to do that.” Do what you have to do when you do it. And if it stinks, you take the blame. And if it’s successful, if they like it, and especially if it makes money, you take all the praise. With drinks of course.

Enjoy Cinéma Cinémas: Samuel Fuller!”

In Richard Schickel’s ‘The Men Who Made the Movies: Sam Fuller’ (2002), the director discusses his philosophy about filmmaking, life experiences, specific films and key scenes in his movies.

Also highly recommended is the 1996 documentary ‘The Typewriter, the Rifle & the Movie Camera’ narrated by Tim Robbins, and with the participation of Quentin Tarantino, Jim Jarmusch, and Martin Scorsese.

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

7:55 am - Sam, Fév 1, 2014
2 notes
JANCSO
©Prod DB

JANCSO

©Prod DB

9:45 am - Jeu, Jan 16, 2014
68 notes

 Sergio Leone brandishing toy guns, Jan 1973
Sergio Leone brandishing toy guns, Jan 1973

(via cinemamonamour)

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